Data Sources for Brand Data



The updated BDMS is divided into two main sources of return share data – 1) Historic and Maine Brand Count Data; and 2) Ongoing Brand Share Sampling Data.  Because of the significant differences in the manner in which brand data are collected for brand count and sampling data, the BDMS does not combine the two main sources.  Under a brand count, all units are weighed and recorded individually.  Under the sampling programs, a statistically valid sampling methodology is followed to select certain units to weigh and record.  Below are a few notes about each of the data sources.

Sampling Share Sources

  • Illinois Environmental Protection Agency (beginning 2010)

As part of the Illinois electronics recycling law, recyclers are to conduct sampling days and report quarterly to the Illinois EPA.  These sampling reports cover computers, monitors, printers and televisions. For more information, see: http://www.epa.state.il.us/land/electronic-waste-recycling/index.html

  • Oregon Department of Environmental Quality (beginning 2010)

Under a process similar to Washington under the Oregon electronics recycling law, the State Contractor Program and any manufacturer program must conducts sampling events (or perform a complete brand count) on a schedule determined by the DEQ.  These sampling share data are then used by the Department to establish annual return shares for each covered manufacturer.  The data cover televisions, computer monitors, desktop computers, and laptop computers.  For more information, see: http://www.deq.state.or.us/lq/ecycle/manufacturers/recycling.htm#returnshare  

  • Washington Department of Ecology (beginning 2009)

Under a process spelled out in the regulations implementing the Washington electronics recycling law, the Standard Plan managed by the Washington Materials Management and Financing Authority conducts sampling events on a schedule determined by the Department of Ecology.  These sampling share data are then used by the Department to establish annual return shares for each covered manufacturer.  The data cover televisions, computer monitors, desktop computers, and laptop computers.  For more information, see: http://www.ecy.wa.gov/programs/swfa/eproductrecycle/returnShare.html

 

Historic and Maine Brand Count Sources

The initial version of the BDMS contained only brand counts from specific projects from around the United States: 1) Florida Electronics Brand Distribution Study (2004/2005 data) ; 2) Hennepin County Consumer Electronics Brand Tally (2004); 3) Good Guys Electronics Take-back Pilot Project (2004, Washington State); 4) Staples Reverse Distribution Pilot (2004, New England states); 5) NCER West Virginia Collection Event Program (2006); 6) Kane County Collection (December 9, 2006, Illinois). While the data across all sources was generally compatible, differences across program data, such as brand name spellings and units of measure (units vs. weight) were harmonized manually by the NCER.   In 2006 the state of Maine began a comprehensive brand count program for covered devices.  This is the only ongoing brand count program in the country.  In February 2011, a similar program was launched in Connecticut for which data are expected to be available in 2012.

Florida DEP collected brand return data from 2004-06 and its reports were not associated with a mandated state program. Although its sample size was smaller than Hennepin County, it has a sophisticated data tracking program that allows users to track changes over time.

The largest of the four sample sizes, this study comes from the one of the longest-running and most successful electronics recycling programs in the country.

This project was completed as part of the US EPA Plug-In To eCycling Program. This study and the collection program only covers televisions. Thus, these data are removed in any comparisons of units or weight combined across all product categories so as not to skew the report towards television brands.

This project was also completed as part of the US EPA Plug-In To eCycling Program. TVs were not accepted in this program, and therefore no brand count data for TVs exists for this study. Like the Good Guys data source, these data are removed in any comparison of units or weight combined across all product categories so as not to skew the report towards the monitor, laptop, and desktop computer brands collected under this program.

The NCER managed a series of collection events from February to September 2006 in 8 locations in West Virginia. At the event, NCER staff performed a brand count of all returned TVs, computer monitors, desktop computers, and laptop computers. The collection event program targeted West Virginia residents and small business and included a limit of 5-10 units per vehicle. This program recorded the brands of 1325 monitors, 512 TVs, 1195 desktops, and 52 laptops.

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Region 5 tasked Booz Allen Hamilton (Booz Allen) to perform a brand sort for returned electronic devices at a collection event held on Saturday, December 9, 2006. The purpose of the brand sort was to provide EPA with data on the brands and corresponding weights of returned consumer electronic equipment during a typical local government collection event in Region 5. The data will be used to provide EPA and the Agency’s partners with baseline information regarding the specific types of equipment that are currently being returned at collection events in Region 5. Brands from a total of 943 units across TVs, desktops, laptops and monitors were recorded for this project.

In  2004, Maine passed the first electronics producer responsibility law titled An Act to Protect the Public Health and the Environment by Providing for a System of Shared Responsibility for the Safe Collection and Recycling of Electronic Waste, (P.L. Chapter 661). Under the program, consolidators recorded brands of all covered electronic devices (laptop computers, computer monitors, and televisions) received from collectors until 2009. As of 2010, the product scope expanded to include desktop printers, video game consoles, and digital picture frames.  However, as of 2010 television brands were no longer recorded due to the switch to market share allocation of TV recycling costs.  State-approved consolidators report to Maine DEP a count of brands of monitors (includes laptop computers) and printers. Since the Maine law requires brand counting  of some covered products on an ongoing basis, new data will be added to the BDMS as soon as it is made available by the DEP.

 

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